REVIEW – Dead Effect 2 Xbox One With Live Stream

Slow Shooting

Ported from the mobile environment, Dead Effect 2 is a FPS created by a small team of developers that isn’t necessarily designed to be the next Halo or Call of Duty. Instead, gameplay is rather straightforward (go here, shoot this, protect that, open this, etc) and environmental design repeats but there is just enough here to warrant a purchase if you don’t mind spending a few bucks, looking through some obvious flaws, and ultimately like to shoot undead things.

Check out my Let’s Play of Dead Effect 2 so you can see gameplay for yourself:

It is easy see this game’s home is originally from a mobile environment as there is no jump button, enemies move as if they are walking through molasses, can gun combat is rather loose. These gameplay touches were most likely implemented on purpose as it makes playing on a smart phone a little easier for the player although the lack of an auto lock-on function is detrimental. Also, each stage is rather short, most being around ten minutes or even quicker if you are going for faster times as opposed to finding the optional secrets in each stage. However, this is actually a step in the right direction since each stage looks exactly the same; the player is basically working through a spaceship filled with undead humans and creatures. If levels were any longer, had open corridors, or branching paths, there would be no way the player could easily navigate such an environmental maze when everything is so dark and looks the same.

Besides repeating metal-based closed environments that are too dark and on the shorter side, the voice acting is laughably bad and animations are aren’t exactly the smoothest. But since this game was made by such a small team, it wouldn’t be fair to compare it to popular AAA FPSs. Where Dead Effect 2 prides itself is probably from the extensive RPG-like leveling features. Instead of simply upgrading your character with enhanced abilities, the player is also free to purchase new weapons and upgrades accordingly. In fact, this upgrading system might actually be too advanced as there are many menus to click though, are difficult to navigate with a controller as opposed to a touch screen, are not explained very well, and could see where microtransactions could be placed. It is also worth pointing out that Dead Effect 2 has tons of Achievements to unlock but many are not listed well. There are tons of level specific Achievements to earn but they are simply labeled as something like “don’t use the turret gun” as opposed to “don’t use the turret gun on level 4.” Achievement hunters will have a difficult time trying to decipher it all.

You will be shooting a lot of these zombie dogs

Even though there are plenty of obvious flaws with this zombie shooter, it isn’t all bad. While the story is rather cheesy, the HUB room in which you can optionally talk to your friendly AI does a respectable job of fleshing out the story with some detail. Personally, I actually prefer the shortness of each stage as makes the overall quest easier to swallow since gunplay is loose and the environments repeat. I did run into some issues with the pacing of the game but this could be a product of the complicated leveling system. Death is also handled with that pay-to-play mentality in mind as the player is given the option to be revived right on the spot by spending in-game money. But here on console, it is preferred since repeating an entire stage because of an over powered boss is beyond frustrating.

By no means is Dead Effect 2 a “great” game but is still recommend for players with an open mind. If you are hesitant on purchasing the Xbox One version, which could take a couple dozen hours to complete, then at least check out the free-to-start mobile version.

SCORE: 6.7/10

Not As Good As: your triple A first person shooters
Also Try: Resident Evil: The Umbrella Chronicles
Wait For It: Left4Dead3

By: Zachary Gasiorowski, Editor in Chief myGamer.com
Twitter: @ZackGaz

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